What you can Learn from my DIY Online Store Launch:

It has been another stressful month of intense weekend work and low levels of published output on my blog. I finally invested in a WordPress Business Plan and after two months of unsuccessful haggling on Fiver, I hired a web designer at a reasonable price to construct me a professional website.

 

Well, investing in a business plan proved to be an act of faith I should have taken many moons ago, but I did not know exactly what I wanted from a web designer and did a poor job of communication and a lot of praying for a good outcome. This I would not advise.

 

I learned that an author website and platform is a very personal thing. What I received for two hundred dollars did not in any way artistically represent my platform, values and purpose. With intense stress, I had to part with two hundred dollars I could have invested in advertising and learn to use plugins and set up a professional website on my own using models from other platforms to teach me.

 

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Website Launch

Bay Area Psychotherapist and Survivor of a Schizophrenia Diagnosis Launches Website to Sell Award-Winning Memoir and Training Services!

In launching online store, author Tim Dreby comes out of the closet to promote his writing platform. Selling books and services independently marks a new beginning for the middle-age debut writer who works to redefine the manner in which the public understands psychosis.

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OAKLAND, Calif. (PRWEB) July 16, 2018

July 7, 2018, in the volatile market of indie books and treating psychosis, is there any such thing as a guidebook? Ever since canceling a book contract to maintain the integrity of his work, author Tim Dreby has struggled with a profound sense of invisibility.

Like many independent authors in this era, Tim took to marketing with little guidance, time or money when his memoir Fighting for Freedom in America was released. Busy finishing up a grant program that was constructed off his own theoretical training platform, he did not immediately rise in Amazon’s ranks.

In retrospect, Tim was still was ambivalent about having his private world public. Waiting for the awards and five star reviews to come back, Tim approached the issue of being an author in the iconoclastic tradition of authors/artists he most admires, J.D. Salinger and Charles Bukowski, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waites, and KRS-One, without doing research or conforming to social dictates.

He told an NPR journalist in a preliminary interview that he’d often heard things in local radio broadcasts about mental health that are offensive. Correspondence was cut off. Right before an interview with Malik Shakur of The Knowledge Show he signed into the page and viewed the image of a packaged condom that was ripped open. After a most interesting interaction, he was not invited back. On his interview with Will Hall on Madness Radio one listener commented, “For me this interview was one of the more ‘off beat’ ones I’ve heard thus far. Off beat in the sense of fascinating, informative, on the slightly bizarre side . . ., vulnerable, respectful, inclusive and ultimately oh so human.”

Tim’s former pen name still rests on his memoir, Clyde Dee. Clyde is Tim’s middle name and Dee is the first letter of his last name and the last name of his second favorite rapper all time.

Having found that his family members support him or take offense regardless of the use of a pseudonym Tim is now fully out on his website. Building a platform to promote his writing and sell his training and memoir has been a slow process and involved learning some new skills.Still, his marketing strategy has been his own spirit more than guidebooks.

The site is full of mental health essays, poetry, personal updates along with rough drafts and summations of his therapy platform he hopes to advance.

More than just a resource for suffers, family members and providers to use to excel, Tim hopes his site and work will help re-define the public’s view of what psychosis really is.

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Using Leverage in the Treatment of Psychosis

When I was in psychosis, or what I prefer to call message crisis, I was extremely angry when my family used leverage to force me into treatment. For starters, they contacted the police and supported a three-month hospitalization that kept me from seeking asylum in Canada. I concluded that they were a mafia family and the reason I was getting followed and harassed.

Perhaps this scenario sounds familiar to the reader? It lasted for two years after I was released from the hospital.

I continue to feel hurt by many of the things that transpired due to leverage. I may be able to act like I forgive; but I will never forget what it was like to experience such cruelty alone.

Thank god I was wrong about some of it!

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Initial Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE     

 

Outskirts Press Releases New Memoir About Surviving a Diagnosis of Schizophrenia:

Fighting for Freedom in America by Clyde Dee

 

In the frontiers of America’s mental health institutions, fighting for freedom can become very personal.

September 24, 2015 – Denver, CO and Oakland, CA – In Fighting for Freedom in America, released by Outskirts Press, mental health counselor and author Clyde Dee asks, “Have you ever wondered if something is wrong with you? Have you ever wondered what it is like to find yourself driven into madness; and whether you will ever come back from catastrophic loss?”

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Waiting to Hear Back

Having returned from an east coast trip to attend the memorial of my stepfather, I am a little late with my monthly update. The trip back east was hard as my mother is currently suffering from her loss. I tried to spend time with her to offer her support, but my need to stay busy and our vastly differing interests made the week challenging for both of us.

 

Those who may have visited my blog may notice that I have only published one post this month. I have been working extensively on one essay that I am trying to prepare to get published. It is frustrating because I feel unproductive, but I have a need to master the essay and prove that I can publish.

 

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Maintaining a Write-to-Live Attitude in the Social Media Era

I feel sorry for my English professor who wanted to put my essay up for an award! The glare I gave him and the lack of response: it was, at its best, very rude.

 

The fact is, I only learned it bothered him because my best friend who was fifteen years older than me got an invite to the professor’s house for dinner. My friend who had a lifetime of experience using and dealing drugs reported that the professor had called his cute, sleeping hound a beast repeatedly throughout the night and talked about how alcohol was his drug of choice while toasting his guest’s sobriety. However, my friend reported, when it came to me, the professor admitted that he just didn’t know what to say.

 

“I think I know what that kid’s problem is,” the professor had conceded.

 

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How to Work with Issues of Mental Health Warehousing as a Professional

Early in my career as a social worker, I couldn’t even see the phenomenon of mental health warehousing let alone know how address the issue in a relationship. My college texts had promoted the mainstream eugenic presumptions associated with mental illness. I didn’t know what was needed to recover from things like psychosis, personality disorders, or addictions and live a fulfilling life other than to tell the client to take their medication.

 

Now, in my twenty-three years of experience working in the system, I have seen many other workers not really learn about the effects of mental health warehousing. It’s as if those of us who work in the field slept during social psychology lessons of Stanley Milligram and the Stanford Prison Experiments. And many of us who do understand the dehumanization process associated with warehousing may abandon the work for private practice. It’d nice it they left a little space in their practice for warehoused individuals. Perhaps some do.

 

Believe me, I never imagined that mental health warehousing would happen to a conscientious person who excelled in the mental health professional like myself. I used to think I was empathetic towards clients because that’s what always impressed others about me. Now I think I was just sympathetic and encapsulated! Indeed, though it could happen to most us, we rarely think that way. When I did land in warehousing, it was a real education.

 

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