Website Launch

Bay Area Psychotherapist and Survivor of a Schizophrenia Diagnosis Launches Website to Sell Award-Winning Memoir and Training Services!

In launching online store, author Tim Dreby comes out of the closet to promote his writing platform. Selling books and services independently marks a new beginning for the middle-age debut writer who works to redefine the manner in which the public understands psychosis.

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OAKLAND, Calif. (PRWEB) July 16, 2018

July 7, 2018, in the volatile market of indie books and treating psychosis, is there any such thing as a guidebook? Ever since canceling a book contract to maintain the integrity of his work, author Tim Dreby has struggled with a profound sense of invisibility.

Like many independent authors in this era, Tim took to marketing with little guidance, time or money when his memoir Fighting for Freedom in America was released. Busy finishing up a grant program that was constructed off his own theoretical training platform, he did not immediately rise in Amazon’s ranks.

In retrospect, Tim was still was ambivalent about having his private world public. Waiting for the awards and five star reviews to come back, Tim approached the issue of being an author in the iconoclastic tradition of authors/artists he most admires, J.D. Salinger and Charles Bukowski, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waites, and KRS-One, without doing research or conforming to social dictates.

He told an NPR journalist in a preliminary interview that he’d often heard things in local radio broadcasts about mental health that are offensive. Correspondence was cut off. Right before an interview with Malik Shakur of The Knowledge Show he signed into the page and viewed the image of a packaged condom that was ripped open. After a most interesting interaction, he was not invited back. On his interview with Will Hall on Madness Radio one listener commented, “For me this interview was one of the more ‘off beat’ ones I’ve heard thus far. Off beat in the sense of fascinating, informative, on the slightly bizarre side . . ., vulnerable, respectful, inclusive and ultimately oh so human.”

Tim’s former pen name still rests on his memoir, Clyde Dee. Clyde is Tim’s middle name and Dee is the first letter of his last name and the last name of his second favorite rapper all time.

Having found that his family members support him or take offense regardless of the use of a pseudonym Tim is now fully out on his website. Building a platform to promote his writing and sell his training and memoir has been a slow process and involved learning some new skills.Still, his marketing strategy has been his own spirit more than guidebooks.

The site is full of mental health essays, poetry, personal updates along with rough drafts and summations of his therapy platform he hopes to advance.

More than just a resource for suffers, family members and providers to use to excel, Tim hopes his site and work will help re-define the public’s view of what psychosis really is.

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Using Leverage in the Treatment of Psychosis

When I was in psychosis, or what I prefer to call message crisis, I was extremely angry when my family used leverage to force me into treatment. For starters, they contacted the police and supported a three-month hospitalization that kept me from seeking asylum in Canada. I concluded that they were a mafia family and the reason I was getting followed and harassed.

Perhaps this scenario sounds familiar to the reader? It lasted for two years after I was released from the hospital.

I continue to feel hurt by many of the things that transpired due to leverage. I may be able to act like I forgive; but I will never forget what it was like to experience such cruelty alone.

Thank god I was wrong about some of it!

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Waiting to Hear Back

Having returned from an east coast trip to attend the memorial of my stepfather, I am a little late with my monthly update. The trip back east was hard as my mother is currently suffering from her loss. I tried to spend time with her to offer her support, but my need to stay busy and our vastly differing interests made the week challenging for both of us.

 

Those who may have visited my blog may notice that I have only published one post this month. I have been working extensively on one essay that I am trying to prepare to get published. It is frustrating because I feel unproductive, but I have a need to master the essay and prove that I can publish.

 

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How to Work with Issues of Mental Health Warehousing as a Professional

Early in my career as a social worker, I couldn’t even see the phenomenon of mental health warehousing let alone know how address the issue in a relationship. My college texts had promoted the mainstream eugenic presumptions associated with mental illness. I didn’t know what was needed to recover from things like psychosis, personality disorders, or addictions and live a fulfilling life other than to tell the client to take their medication.

 

Now, in my twenty-three years of experience working in the system, I have seen many other workers not really learn about the effects of mental health warehousing. It’s as if those of us who work in the field slept during social psychology lessons of Stanley Milligram and the Stanford Prison Experiments. And many of us who do understand the dehumanization process associated with warehousing may abandon the work for private practice. It’d nice it they left a little space in their practice for warehoused individuals. Perhaps some do.

 

Believe me, I never imagined that mental health warehousing would happen to a conscientious person who excelled in the mental health professional like myself. I used to think I was empathetic towards clients because that’s what always impressed others about me. Now I think I was just sympathetic and encapsulated! Indeed, though it could happen to most us, we rarely think that way. When I did land in warehousing, it was a real education.

 

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Are you Prepared to Address Psychosis in Your Practice? (Feature-Length Version)

In Madness and Civilization, philosopher Michel Foucault has predicted a proliferation of madness as disparities increase and modern society advances. Indeed, with psychopharmacology industry booming, rates of addiction, fueled by the opioid epidemic, skyrocketing, terrorism wars raging abroad, ongoing drug wars afflicting low income neighborhoods, escalation in homeless encampments in major cities, and a rise in bullying in schools, and even cyberbullying, it really does seem like higher percentage of people have been forced to explore their mental health struggles. While mass shootings have kept danger stigma in the media high and the media response continues to reinforce silence about mental struggles, the field of psychotherapy does have a lot more trends to address.

When I look through my state’s psychotherapy association’s annual conference, I see many of these trends getting addressed in workshops. But ever invisible is the issue of psychosis. Is it possible that the issue of psychosis functions as a significant part of the madness narrative? Is it possible that psychosis too is affecting more and more Americans as Foucault inferred?

 

 

What the Statistic Say: Continue reading “Are you Prepared to Address Psychosis in Your Practice? (Feature-Length Version)”

How Diversifying Causation Beliefs Can Lead to Recovery from Psychosis

I believe that a powerful dialectic exists when participants study their similarities in psychoses focus groups. Converse to the great opportunities for growth that result when participants genuinely identify with each other, there are often important points of difference highlighted that likewise can lead to growth when nurtured properly.

I have observed that participants often become more aware of their diverse beliefs regarding the causation of their psychosis experiences. I also believe that the causation of psychosis experiences is a natural preoccupation for people who suffer. In fact, this preoccupation is so powerful, it warrants becoming part of the definition of psychosis in the model of treatment I have created.

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The Issue of Medication for Psychosis

The issue of whether to take medication or not can be a difficult one. While medication may work well for some, it may do little for others. This syncs with the fact that experiences associated with psychosis are vast and varied. People who suffer are very diverse, and causation remains nebulous.

I believe that causation for each person is a constellation of a series of modalities. I have witnessed how comparing causation theories becomes the spice of life in a psychosis support group. I find support groups for people who experience what is labeled as psychosis to be full of cultural learning that can result in powerful growth and wisdom.

As someone whose been in recovery for fifteen years, I have also witnessed the issue of medication to be politically divisive amongst message receivers or people who experience psychosis. Personally, I am starting to see it more as an element of cultural diversity in which differences can make the support groups I run vibrant and spectacular.

I believe I have a moderate view on this topic, which means it can be hard not to feel under attack in differing circles. My hope in this article is to provide perspectives to help people make their own decision about medication and work together regardless of their views and life experience.

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Two, Trauma-Sensitive Solutions for Psychosis

When I experienced two years of psychosis early during my career as a mental health counselor, I was already getting good at managing trauma with my master’s level training. I always been pretty good at being safe for others.

I wanted some of that trauma support when I found myself confined to a ward on a State Hospital. I knew I needed to establish safety with someone but couldn’t find anyone who would deal with me. Instead, no one treated me as though I was traumatized because they didn’t want to reinforce my delusions. This only made the trauma of what I experienced worse. Invariably, hospital workers were punitive and denied anything unjust was happening to me at all.

Because I worked tirelessly and had family support, I was able to return to my career in mental health. I got my psychotherapy license ten years ago and since that time I have worked to create trauma-sensitive treatment to address the needs of individuals who experience psychosis. Here, I intend to convey two trauma-sensitive solutions I have developed, working with people in groups and in individual treatment.

 

The Challenge of Establishing Trust: Continue reading “Two, Trauma-Sensitive Solutions for Psychosis”

Why I Say Special Messages Instead of Psychosis

For the past ten years I have used the words special messages to bring people together behind a better-defined notion of psychosis. I hope in this article will help better define what I mean by special messages and why I think that messages are part of a process that includes seven other components that I defined in my last article.

Many people who have worked with me presume that when I say special messages I mean voices. It’s true that the words hearing voices ring true as music to my ears. Indeed, the hearing voices movement has vastly improved the social understanding of what is happening to message receivers. Less dominant are the memes associated with all the “psycho” stigma that gets equated with the psychosis word. However, I still argue that just saying hearing voices fails to unite all people under the umbrella of the word psychosis.

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